Difference between revisions of "A Basic LSL Tutorial"

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When you create a '''New Script''' from within the Content tab of a prim or from the context menu of your inventory, the system writes a simple script with the following lines of LSL code:
 
When you create a '''New Script''' from within the Content tab of a prim or from the context menu of your inventory, the system writes a simple script with the following lines of LSL code:
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 18: Line 18:
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
This script will basically chat "Hello, Avatar!" on the public channel when it is created and will then chat "Touched." on the same public channel when an avatar touches the prim the script is in.
+
The above script will basically chat "Hello, Avatar!" on the public channel when it is created and will then chat "Touched." on the same public channel when an avatar touches the prim the script is in.
 +
 
 +
'''Script formatting and Indenting'''
 +
-------------------------------
 +
Throughout these examples you will observe a strict layout being followed. Each closing } aligns vertically with its opening {. Code within { and } is indented. It is strongly recommended that you follow this practice rigorously. While the compiler is only concerned with bracket matching, indenting and vertical bracket alignment are of great assistance when studying the logic of a script. There is a free tool, lslEditor, for editing, compiling, and even testing scripts off-world, that includes an excellent facility for automatically indenting your code correctly. You can download lslEditor from http://sourceforge.net/projects/lsleditor/  and the auto-indent facility is invoked via CTRL+D.
  
 
'''Errors and how to fix them?'''
 
'''Errors and how to fix them?'''
 
---------------------------
 
---------------------------
If you get an error while scripting at any time, it will usually be that you have missed
+
If you get an error while scripting at any time, it may well be that you have missed
out a ; at the end of a function or a { or a } after or before an event. This is the most
+
out a ; at the end of a function or a { or a } after or before an event. These are the most
common error (a syntax error). Sometimes this may not be the case though.
+
common errors (a syntax error). Sometimes this may not be the case though.
  
 
'''Basic terms''':
 
'''Basic terms''':
 
-----------------------------
 
-----------------------------
LSL '''''Functions''''' are shown as red within the Script Editor's composing window.
+
LSL '''Functions''' are shown as red within the Script Editor's composing window.
  
LSL '''''Events''''' are shown in blue.
+
LSL '''Events''' are shown in blue.
  
'''''TRUE''''' and '''''FALSE''''' are Boolean variables. FALSE is equal to the integer 0 and TRUE is equal to the integer 1.
+
'''TRUE''' and '''FALSE''' are Boolean variables. [[FALSE]] is equal to the integer 0 and [[TRUE]] is equal to the integer 1.
  
 
'''DATA Types'''
 
'''DATA Types'''
  
A '''''String''''' is a string of alphanumeric characters surrounded by quotation marks, (eg. "Hello Bill").
+
A '''String''' is a string of alphanumeric characters surrounded by quotation marks, (eg. "Hello Bill").
  
An '''''Integer''''' is a whole number between −2,147,483,648 and +2,147,483,647, which includes 0.
+
An '''Integer''' is a whole number between −2,147,483,648 and +2,147,483,647, which includes 0.
  
A '''''Float''''' is a number with a decimal fraction like 1.0 or 1.000000 depending on the precision you need in your calculations.
+
A '''Float''' is a number with a decimal fraction like 1.0 or 1.23456 depending on the precision you need in your calculations.
  
A '''''Vector''''' is a set of three floats enclosed in < pointy brackets > like so: <0.0, 0.0, 0.0>. They can represent colours and positions.
+
A '''Vector''' is a set of three floats enclosed in < pointy brackets > like so: <0.0, 0.0, 0.0>. They can represent colours and positions.
  
A '''''Key''''' is a randomly generated Universally Unique Identifier (UUID). This specialized string consists of 32 hex characters with four dashes.
+
A '''Key''' is a randomly generated Universally Unique Identifier (UUID). This specialized string consists of 32 hex characters with four dashes.
  
  
Line 52: Line 56:
 
-------
 
-------
 
Let's begin by learning an easy task first by making the box say something else
 
Let's begin by learning an easy task first by making the box say something else
when you touch/click it. You can do this by editing the "llSay(0, "Touched.");" line within the touch_start event. Just edit the string between the quote marks. The function llSay()'s format is interpreted as meaning:  
+
when you touch/click it. You can do this by editing the "[[llSay]](0, "Touched.");" line within the touch_start event. Just edit the string between the quote marks. The function [[llSay]]()'s format is interpreted as meaning:
llSay(Channel number to transmit the text, "string of text to send");
+
[[llSay]](Channel number to transmit the text, "string of text to send");
  
llSay is not the only communication function within the LSL. You can also try out:
+
[[llSay]] is not the only communication function within the LSL. You can also try out:
  
llShout(Channel, "SHOUT STUFF");//can be heard 100m away from originating script
+
[[llShout]](Channel, "SHOUT STUFF");//can be heard 100m away from originating script
llWhisper(Channel, "WHISPER STUFF");//can be heard 10m distance
+
[[llWhisper]](Channel, "WHISPER STUFF");//can be heard 10m distance
llOwnerSay("SAY STUFF TO YOU ONLY");
+
[[llOwnerSay]]("SAY STUFF TO YOU ONLY");
llRegionSay(Channel, "REGION SAY STUFF");//can be heard within the entire region
+
[[llRegionSay]](Channel, "REGION SAY STUFF");//can be heard within the entire region
  
  
 
'''TASK 2''':
 
'''TASK 2''':
 
-------
 
-------
Let's just add some information after this explaining what it each thing does,  
+
Let's just add some information after this explaining what it each thing does,
 
you can do this by adding // and anything after it will appear orange, this is a comment.
 
you can do this by adding // and anything after it will appear orange, this is a comment.
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 75: Line 79:
 
     state_entry()
 
     state_entry()
 
     {
 
     {
    //  PUBLIC_CHANNEL has the integer value 0
+
         llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
+
 
     }
 
     }
  
Line 82: Line 85:
 
     touch_start(integer num_detected)
 
     touch_start(integer num_detected)
 
     {
 
     {
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Touched.");
+
         llSay(0, "Touched.");
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
 
'''TASK 3''':
 
'''TASK 3''':
Line 96: Line 99:
 
http://www.lslwiki.net/lslwiki/wakka.php?wakka=color
 
http://www.lslwiki.net/lslwiki/wakka.php?wakka=color
  
If it was a linked object you could use llSetLinkColor; its layout is  
+
If it was a linked object you could use [[llSetLinkColor]]; its layout is
llSetLinkColor(integer linknumber, vector color, integer face).
+
[[llSetLinkColor]](integer linknumber, vector color, integer face).
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 106: Line 109:
 
     state_entry()
 
     state_entry()
 
     {
 
     {
    //  PUBLIC_CHANNEL has the integer value 0
+
         llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
+
 
     }
 
     }
  
Line 117: Line 119:
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
  
Line 123: Line 125:
 
-------
 
-------
 
Let's now make it have text appear over it, you can do this by using the function
 
Let's now make it have text appear over it, you can do this by using the function
llSetText, its layout is llSetText(string text, vector color, float alpha).
+
[[llSetText]], its layout is [[llSetText]](string text, vector color, float alpha).
Basically if you do this llSetText("HELLO CAN YOU READ THIS",<1,0,0>,1);
+
Basically if you do this [[llSetText]]("HELLO CAN YOU READ THIS",<1,0,0>,1);
 
will appear as HELLO CAN YOU READ THIS in the colour red. Alpha is the transparency,
 
will appear as HELLO CAN YOU READ THIS in the colour red. Alpha is the transparency,
if you did llSetText("HELLO CAN YOU READ THIS",<1,0,0>,0); you wouldn't be able to see it.
+
if you did [[llSetText]]("HELLO CAN YOU READ THIS",<1,0,0>,0); you wouldn't be able to see it.
 
0 = high transparency, 0.5 = in the middle, 1 = no transparency.
 
0 = high transparency, 0.5 = in the middle, 1 = no transparency.
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 136: Line 138:
 
     state_entry()
 
     state_entry()
 
     {
 
     {
    //  PUBLIC_CHANNEL has the integer value 0
+
         llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
+
 
     }
 
     }
  
Line 147: Line 148:
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
 
'''TASK 5''':
 
'''TASK 5''':
 
-------
 
-------
 
Now that you understand alpha we shall make our object disappear!
 
Now that you understand alpha we shall make our object disappear!
To do this we will use the function llSetAlpha, its layout is llSetAlpha(float alpha, integer face).
+
To do this we will use the function [[llSetAlpha]], its layout is [[llSetAlpha]](float alpha, integer face).
llSetAlpha(0, ALL_SIDES); would make all the faces of the object transparent.
+
[[llSetAlpha]](0, [[ALL_SIDES]]); would make all the faces of the object transparent.
If it was a linked object you could use llSetLinkAlpha, which its layout is
+
If it was a linked object you could use [[llSetLinkAlpha]], which its layout is
llSetLinkAlpha(integer linknumber, float alpha, integer face).
+
[[llSetLinkAlpha]](integer linknumber, float alpha, integer face).
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 164: Line 165:
 
     state_entry()
 
     state_entry()
 
     {
 
     {
    //  PUBLIC_CHANNEL has the integer value 0
+
         llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
+
 
     }
 
     }
  
Line 175: Line 175:
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
  
 
'''Task 6''':
 
'''Task 6''':
 
-------
 
-------
Let's try make our object texture itself, to do this we will use the function llSetTexture, its
+
Let's try make our object texture itself, to do this we will use the function [[llSetTexture]], its
layout is llSetTexture(string texture, integer face).You can do this two ways, you can place a  
+
layout is [[llSetTexture]](string texture, integer face).You can do this two ways, you can place a
texture inside the object or use a UUID. To make it change to a texture you have placed inside  
+
texture inside the object or use a UUID. To make it change to a texture you have placed inside
the object, do it like this llSetTexture("NAME OF TEXTURE", ALL_SIDES);
+
the object, do it like this [[llSetTexture]]("NAME OF TEXTURE", [[ALL_SIDES]]);
 
If you want to use a UUID, find a texture in your inventory, right click it > copy asset UUID,
 
If you want to use a UUID, find a texture in your inventory, right click it > copy asset UUID,
then paste the UUID in the "" so it looks like this  
+
then paste the UUID in the "" so it looks like this
llSetTexture("j4m3s000-0000-0000-0000-b3n3d3k00000", ALL_SIDES);
+
[[llSetTexture]]("j4m3s000-0000-0000-0000-b3n3d3k00000", [[ALL_SIDES]]);
 
If it was a linked object you could use llSetLinkTexture, which its layout is
 
If it was a linked object you could use llSetLinkTexture, which its layout is
llSetLinkTexture(integer linknumber, string texture, integer face);
+
[[llSetLinkTexture]](integer linknumber, string texture, integer face);
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 197: Line 197:
 
     state_entry()
 
     state_entry()
 
     {
 
     {
    //  PUBLIC_CHANNEL has the integer value 0
+
         llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
+
 
     }
 
     }
  
Line 208: Line 207:
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
 
'''Task 7''':
 
'''Task 7''':
Line 214: Line 213:
 
Now let's move onto something more tricky. As you understand a bit about keys we will make our object
 
Now let's move onto something more tricky. As you understand a bit about keys we will make our object
 
only respond when the owner clicks the object. This is called an if statement.
 
only respond when the owner clicks the object. This is called an if statement.
To do this we will need to use the functions llGetOwner() and llDetectedKey(0);, llGetOwner will
+
To do this we will need to use the functions [[llGetOwner]]() and [[llDetectedKey]](0);, [[llGetOwner]] will
return your key UUID and llDetectedKey(0) when put under the touch event will return the key of who is
+
return your key UUID and [[llDetectedKey]](0) when put under the touch event will return the key of who is
 
clicking/touching your object. So firstly lay out your script like this:
 
clicking/touching your object. So firstly lay out your script like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 224: Line 223:
 
     state_entry()
 
     state_entry()
 
     {
 
     {
    //  PUBLIC_CHANNEL has the integer value 0
+
         llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
+
 
     }
 
     }
  
Line 235: Line 233:
  
 
         if (owner == touchingAvatar)
 
         if (owner == touchingAvatar)
             llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Touched by owner.");
+
             llSay(0, "Touched by owner.");
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
 
If you want it to do something when someone else other than the owner touches it, use an else statement.
 
If you want it to do something when someone else other than the owner touches it, use an else statement.
 
You can do this by laying out your script like this:
 
You can do this by laying out your script like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 249: Line 247:
 
     state_entry()
 
     state_entry()
 
     {
 
     {
    //  PUBLIC_CHANNEL has the integer value 0
+
         llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
+
 
     }
 
     }
  
Line 260: Line 257:
  
 
         if (owner == touchingAvatar)
 
         if (owner == touchingAvatar)
             llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Touched by owner.");
+
             llSay(0, "Touched by owner.");
 
         else
 
         else
             llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Touched by someone else.");
+
             llSay(0, "Touched by someone else.");
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
 
'''Task 8''':
 
'''Task 8''':
 
-------
 
-------
 
Now let's try make an object do something when you say something, to do this
 
Now let's try make an object do something when you say something, to do this
we will have to use a llListen function, its layout is this
+
we will have to use a [[llListen]] function, its layout is this
llListen(integer channel, string name, key id, string msg);
+
[[llListen]](integer channel, string name, key id, string msg);
 
We will firstly place this under the state_entry() event.
 
We will firstly place this under the state_entry() event.
 
In this task we will just make it use the public channel, which is 0, and we will make it
 
In this task we will just make it use the public channel, which is 0, and we will make it
listen to only you, which requires the llGetOwner() function we used previously.
+
listen to only you, which requires the [[llGetOwner]]() function we used previously.
 
We will then need to use a listen event, its layout is like this
 
We will then need to use a listen event, its layout is like this
 
listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message) {, replace the touch event with this.
 
listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message) {, replace the touch event with this.
 
we will then make the object annoy you by it saying "Really?" whenever you type something XD
 
we will then make the object annoy you by it saying "Really?" whenever you type something XD
This will involve using a llSay like we used in task 1.
+
This will involve using a [[llSay]] like we used in task 1.
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 289: Line 286:
 
         key owner = llGetOwner();
 
         key owner = llGetOwner();
  
    //  PUBLIC_CHANNEL has the integer value 0
+
         llListen(0, "", owner, "");
         llListen(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "", owner, "");
+
 
     }
 
     }
  
Line 296: Line 292:
 
     listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message)
 
     listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message)
 
     {
 
     {
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Received: '" + message + "'.");
+
         llSay(0, "Received: '" + message + "'.");
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
To make it only listen for commands not on the public channel, which will be more secret and  
+
To make it only listen for commands not on the [[PUBLIC_CHANNEL]], which will be more secret and
 
which is less laggy in complex scripts, you can do this by changing the integer 0 to something
 
which is less laggy in complex scripts, you can do this by changing the integer 0 to something
like 99, this time use a llOwnerSay instead of a llSay, which should make it secret.
+
like 99, this time use a [[llOwnerSay]] instead of a llSay, which should make it secret.
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 313: Line 309:
 
         llListen(99,"",llGetOwner(),"");
 
         llListen(99,"",llGetOwner(),"");
 
     }
 
     }
   
+
 
 
     listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message)
 
     listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message)
 
     {
 
     {
Line 320: Line 316:
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
 
To chat in another channel, just type in the chat bar /channel before you type something,
 
To chat in another channel, just type in the chat bar /channel before you type something,
 
in this case it will be "/99 hello" for example.To make it do only certain stuff when you say
 
in this case it will be "/99 hello" for example.To make it do only certain stuff when you say
certain commands we will have to use a if statement, like before but this time we will have  
+
certain commands we will have to use a if statement, like before but this time we will have
to check if the message equals the command, if (message == "Your Command Here").
+
to check if the message equals the command, [[if]] (message == "Your Command Here").
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 335: Line 331:
 
         llListen(99,"",llGetOwner(),"");
 
         llListen(99,"",llGetOwner(),"");
 
     }
 
     }
   
+
 
 
     listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message)
 
     listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message)
 
     {
 
     {
    if (message == "hello")
+
        if (message == "hello")
    {
+
        {
        llOwnerSay("Hello to you too!");
+
            llOwnerSay("Hello to you too!");
    }
+
        }
    else
+
        else
    {
+
        {
        llOwnerSay("INVALID COMMAND");
+
            llOwnerSay("INVALID COMMAND");
    }
+
        }
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
 
To learn more about llListen take a look at:
 
To learn more about llListen take a look at:
Line 357: Line 353:
 
-------
 
-------
 
Now let's experiment with vectors, and make your object move non physically,
 
Now let's experiment with vectors, and make your object move non physically,
to do this we will need to use the function llSetPos, its layout is llSetPos(vector pos);
+
to do this we will need to use the function [[llSetPos]], its layout is [[llSetPos]](vector pos);
We will also use llGetPos() so we can make it move +1 of its current position.
+
We will also use [[llGetPos]]() so we can make it move +1 of its current position.
Place the llSetPos function under a touch event with a vector <0,0,1> + llGetPos();.
+
Place the [[llSetPos]] function under a touch event with a vector <0,0,1> + [[llGetPos]]();.
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 368: Line 364:
 
     state_entry()
 
     state_entry()
 
     {
 
     {
    // PUBLIC_CHANNEL has the integer value 0
+
        // Some scripters prefer to use a 'Mnemonic Constant' for channel zero
 +
        // However, Mnemonic constants are much more useful and are recommended for less obvious values like CHANGED_OWNER instead of remembering the value 128
 +
        // Here is an example. 'PUBLIC_CHANNEL' has the value 0.
 
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
 
         llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
 
     }
 
     }
Line 380: Line 378:
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
 
A position vector layout is in the format x,y,z, so <0,0,1> will make it go up 1m.
 
A position vector layout is in the format x,y,z, so <0,0,1> will make it go up 1m.
Line 391: Line 389:
 
Like when editing an object, you can make it Phantom, Physical...
 
Like when editing an object, you can make it Phantom, Physical...
 
You can also do this with scripting, the function you have to use to do this is
 
You can also do this with scripting, the function you have to use to do this is
llSetStatus, its layout is llSetStatus(integer status, integer value);, so if i wanted
+
[[llSetStatus]], its layout is [[llSetStatus]](integer status, integer value);, so if i wanted
to make my object go physical the integer status would be STATUS_PHYSICS or 1, if i wanted
+
to make my object go physical the integer status would be [[STATUS_PHYSICS]] or 1, if i wanted
to make my object go phantom i would use STATUS_PHANTOM or 16.
+
to make my object go phantom i would use [[STATUS_PHANTOM]] or 16.
 
Your script should look something like this:
 
Your script should look something like this:
  
<lsl>
+
<source lang="lsl2">
 
default
 
default
 
{
 
{
Line 404: Line 402:
 
     }
 
     }
 
}
 
}
</lsl>
+
</source>
  
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  
You now know pretty much the basics of scripting,  
+
You now know pretty much the basics of scripting,
 
but there are still many more functions to use and experiment with yet!!!!!!
 
but there are still many more functions to use and experiment with yet!!!!!!
 
To know more functions and what they do, take a look at these links below:
 
To know more functions and what they do, take a look at these links below:

Latest revision as of 13:20, 24 January 2015

Basic Tutorial on LSL. By James Benedek



When you create a New Script from within the Content tab of a prim or from the context menu of your inventory, the system writes a simple script with the following lines of LSL code:

default
{
    state_entry()
    {
        llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
    }
 
    touch_start(integer total_number)
    {
        llSay(0, "Touched.");
    }
}

The above script will basically chat "Hello, Avatar!" on the public channel when it is created and will then chat "Touched." on the same public channel when an avatar touches the prim the script is in.

Script formatting and Indenting


Throughout these examples you will observe a strict layout being followed. Each closing } aligns vertically with its opening {. Code within { and } is indented. It is strongly recommended that you follow this practice rigorously. While the compiler is only concerned with bracket matching, indenting and vertical bracket alignment are of great assistance when studying the logic of a script. There is a free tool, lslEditor, for editing, compiling, and even testing scripts off-world, that includes an excellent facility for automatically indenting your code correctly. You can download lslEditor from http://sourceforge.net/projects/lsleditor/ and the auto-indent facility is invoked via CTRL+D.

Errors and how to fix them?


If you get an error while scripting at any time, it may well be that you have missed out a ; at the end of a function or a { or a } after or before an event. These are the most common errors (a syntax error). Sometimes this may not be the case though.

Basic terms:


LSL Functions are shown as red within the Script Editor's composing window.

LSL Events are shown in blue.

TRUE and FALSE are Boolean variables. FALSE is equal to the integer 0 and TRUE is equal to the integer 1.

DATA Types

A String is a string of alphanumeric characters surrounded by quotation marks, (eg. "Hello Bill").

An Integer is a whole number between −2,147,483,648 and +2,147,483,647, which includes 0.

A Float is a number with a decimal fraction like 1.0 or 1.23456 depending on the precision you need in your calculations.

A Vector is a set of three floats enclosed in < pointy brackets > like so: <0.0, 0.0, 0.0>. They can represent colours and positions.

A Key is a randomly generated Universally Unique Identifier (UUID). This specialized string consists of 32 hex characters with four dashes.


TASK 1:


Let's begin by learning an easy task first by making the box say something else when you touch/click it. You can do this by editing the "llSay(0, "Touched.");" line within the touch_start event. Just edit the string between the quote marks. The function llSay()'s format is interpreted as meaning: llSay(Channel number to transmit the text, "string of text to send");

llSay is not the only communication function within the LSL. You can also try out:

llShout(Channel, "SHOUT STUFF");//can be heard 100m away from originating script llWhisper(Channel, "WHISPER STUFF");//can be heard 10m distance llOwnerSay("SAY STUFF TO YOU ONLY"); llRegionSay(Channel, "REGION SAY STUFF");//can be heard within the entire region


TASK 2:


Let's just add some information after this explaining what it each thing does, you can do this by adding // and anything after it will appear orange, this is a comment. Your script should look something like this:

default
{
//  when the script has been saved (only in default) or when re-entering this state
    state_entry()
    {
        llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
    }
 
//  when someone starts touching the prim
    touch_start(integer num_detected)
    {
        llSay(0, "Touched.");
    }
}

TASK 3:


Let's now try make it change its color when we click it, the function we will need is llSetColor, its layout is like this llSetColor(vector color, integer face); this basically means if i wanted the cube to be red i would use the vector <1,0,0>, green <0,1,0>, blue <0,0,1>. For a full color chart see the link below:

http://www.lslwiki.net/lslwiki/wakka.php?wakka=color

If it was a linked object you could use llSetLinkColor; its layout is llSetLinkColor(integer linknumber, vector color, integer face). Your script should look something like this:

default
{
//  when the script has been saved (only in default) or when re-entering this state
    state_entry()
    {
        llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
    }
 
//  when someone starts touching the prim
    touch_start(integer num_detected)
    {
    //  color all faces red
        llSetColor(<1.0, 0.0, 0.0>, ALL_SIDES);
    }
}


TASK 4:


Let's now make it have text appear over it, you can do this by using the function llSetText, its layout is llSetText(string text, vector color, float alpha). Basically if you do this llSetText("HELLO CAN YOU READ THIS",<1,0,0>,1); will appear as HELLO CAN YOU READ THIS in the colour red. Alpha is the transparency, if you did llSetText("HELLO CAN YOU READ THIS",<1,0,0>,0); you wouldn't be able to see it. 0 = high transparency, 0.5 = in the middle, 1 = no transparency. Your script should look something like this:

default
{
//  when the script has been saved (only in default) or when re-entering this state
    state_entry()
    {
        llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
    }
 
//  when someone starts touching the prim
    touch_start(integer num_detected)
    {
    //  green and opaque floattext
        llSetText("Nice to meet you!", <0.0, 1.0, 0.0>, 1.0);
    }
}

TASK 5:


Now that you understand alpha we shall make our object disappear! To do this we will use the function llSetAlpha, its layout is llSetAlpha(float alpha, integer face). llSetAlpha(0, ALL_SIDES); would make all the faces of the object transparent. If it was a linked object you could use llSetLinkAlpha, which its layout is llSetLinkAlpha(integer linknumber, float alpha, integer face). Your script should look something like this:

default
{
//  when the script has been saved (only in default) or when re-entering this state
    state_entry()
    {
        llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
    }
 
//  when someone starts touching the prim
    touch_start(integer num_detected)
    {
    //  set all faces to transparent
        llSetAlpha(0.0, ALL_SIDES);
    }
}


Task 6:


Let's try make our object texture itself, to do this we will use the function llSetTexture, its layout is llSetTexture(string texture, integer face).You can do this two ways, you can place a texture inside the object or use a UUID. To make it change to a texture you have placed inside the object, do it like this llSetTexture("NAME OF TEXTURE", ALL_SIDES); If you want to use a UUID, find a texture in your inventory, right click it > copy asset UUID, then paste the UUID in the "" so it looks like this llSetTexture("j4m3s000-0000-0000-0000-b3n3d3k00000", ALL_SIDES); If it was a linked object you could use llSetLinkTexture, which its layout is llSetLinkTexture(integer linknumber, string texture, integer face); Your script should look something like this:

default
{
//  when the script has been saved (only in default) or when re-entering this state
    state_entry()
    {
        llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
    }
 
//  when someone starts touching the prim
    touch_start(integer num_detected)
    {
    //  apply texture within contents of the same prim
        llSetTexture("name of texture", ALL_SIDES);
    }
}

Task 7:


Now let's move onto something more tricky. As you understand a bit about keys we will make our object only respond when the owner clicks the object. This is called an if statement. To do this we will need to use the functions llGetOwner() and llDetectedKey(0);, llGetOwner will return your key UUID and llDetectedKey(0) when put under the touch event will return the key of who is clicking/touching your object. So firstly lay out your script like this:

default
{
//  when the script has been saved (only in default) or when re-entering this state
    state_entry()
    {
        llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
    }
 
//  when someone starts touching the prim
    touch_start(integer num_detected)
    {
        key owner = llGetOwner();
        key touchingAvatar = llDetectedKey(0);
 
        if (owner == touchingAvatar)
            llSay(0, "Touched by owner.");
    }
}

If you want it to do something when someone else other than the owner touches it, use an else statement. You can do this by laying out your script like this:

default
{
//  when the script has been saved (only in default) or when re-entering this state
    state_entry()
    {
        llSay(0, "Hello, Avatar!");
    }
 
//  when someone starts touching the prim
    touch_start(integer num_detected)
    {
        key owner = llGetOwner();
        key touchingAvatar = llDetectedKey(0);
 
        if (owner == touchingAvatar)
            llSay(0, "Touched by owner.");
        else
            llSay(0, "Touched by someone else.");
    }
}

Task 8:


Now let's try make an object do something when you say something, to do this we will have to use a llListen function, its layout is this llListen(integer channel, string name, key id, string msg); We will firstly place this under the state_entry() event. In this task we will just make it use the public channel, which is 0, and we will make it listen to only you, which requires the llGetOwner() function we used previously. We will then need to use a listen event, its layout is like this listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message) {, replace the touch event with this. we will then make the object annoy you by it saying "Really?" whenever you type something XD This will involve using a llSay like we used in task 1. Your script should look something like this:

default
{
//  when the script has been saved (only in default) or when re-entering this state
    state_entry()
    {
        key owner = llGetOwner();
 
        llListen(0, "", owner, "");
    }
 
//  when something has been heared
    listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message)
    {
        llSay(0, "Received: '" + message + "'.");
    }
}

To make it only listen for commands not on the PUBLIC_CHANNEL, which will be more secret and which is less laggy in complex scripts, you can do this by changing the integer 0 to something like 99, this time use a llOwnerSay instead of a llSay, which should make it secret. Your script should look something like this:

default
{
    state_entry()
    {
        llListen(99,"",llGetOwner(),"");
    }
 
    listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message)
    {
 
        llOwnerSay("Really?");
    }
}

To chat in another channel, just type in the chat bar /channel before you type something, in this case it will be "/99 hello" for example.To make it do only certain stuff when you say certain commands we will have to use a if statement, like before but this time we will have to check if the message equals the command, if (message == "Your Command Here"). Your script should look something like this:

default
{
    state_entry()
    {
        llListen(99,"",llGetOwner(),"");
    }
 
    listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string message)
    {
        if (message == "hello")
        {
            llOwnerSay("Hello to you too!");
        }
        else
        {
            llOwnerSay("INVALID COMMAND");
        }
    }
}

To learn more about llListen take a look at:

https://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/llListen

TASK 9:


Now let's experiment with vectors, and make your object move non physically, to do this we will need to use the function llSetPos, its layout is llSetPos(vector pos); We will also use llGetPos() so we can make it move +1 of its current position. Place the llSetPos function under a touch event with a vector <0,0,1> + llGetPos();. Your script should look something like this:

default
{
//  when the script has been saved (only in default) or when re-entering this state
    state_entry()
    {
        // Some scripters prefer to use a 'Mnemonic Constant' for channel zero
        // However, Mnemonic constants are much more useful and are recommended for less obvious values like CHANGED_OWNER instead of remembering the value 128
        // Here is an example. 'PUBLIC_CHANNEL' has the value 0.
        llSay(PUBLIC_CHANNEL, "Hello, Avatar!");
    }
 
//  when someone starts touching the prim
    touch_start(integer num_detected)
    {
        vector oldPosition = llGetPos();
 
        llSetPos(oldPosition + <0.0, 0.0, 1.0>);
    }
}

A position vector layout is in the format x,y,z, so <0,0,1> will make it go up 1m. to learn more take a look at:

https://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/llSetPos

TASK 10:


Like when editing an object, you can make it Phantom, Physical... You can also do this with scripting, the function you have to use to do this is llSetStatus, its layout is llSetStatus(integer status, integer value);, so if i wanted to make my object go physical the integer status would be STATUS_PHYSICS or 1, if i wanted to make my object go phantom i would use STATUS_PHANTOM or 16. Your script should look something like this:

default
{
    state_entry()
    {
        llSetStatus(STATUS_PHYSICS, TRUE);
    }
}

You now know pretty much the basics of scripting, but there are still many more functions to use and experiment with yet!!!!!! To know more functions and what they do, take a look at these links below:

http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/LSL_Portal

http://www.lslwiki.net/lslwiki/wakka.php?wakka=HomePage

http://rpgstats.com/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page