Difference between revisions of "Mesh/Calculating prim equivalent weight"

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Prim equivalence is Second Life's mechanism for calculating the computational weight of an object in terms of traditional [http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Viewerhelp:Glossary#prim prims].  All mesh objects and all objects with a [[fake link|physics type]] other than '''Prim''' have a prim-equivalent ''weight'' for the purposes of consuming a land parcel or region's prim capacity.  Therefore, an object with a prim equivalent weight of 42 is equal to a linked object composed of 42 normal prims.
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By using prim equivalence, we make sure that mesh objects and traditional prim objects receive fair shares of Viewer and server resources, encouraging content creators to continue designing prim-efficient objects even if they're working with uploaded meshes.
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== How it works ==
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For each object in the Second Life world, Second Life compares three important performance factors: ''streaming weight'', ''physics weight'', and ''simulation weight''.  It then chooses the highest of these weights and assigns it to the mesh as the mesh's prim-equivalent value.  Normally, only the resulting prim-equivalent value can be seen in the Viewer, but vehicle designers can choose to view the physics weight by setting ShowAdvancedBuilderOptions to '''TRUE''' in the DEBUG SETTINGS window.
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Here's a very quick overview of the different weights; for more information on each, follow the links below:
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* '''[[Mesh/Mesh_Streaming_Cost|Streaming weight]]''': Calculated by determining how much bandwidth is required to download and view the object.  Larger and more visually complex objects have a higher streaming weight.  You can reduce the streaming weight of complex objects by uploading less complex meshes for differing [[fake link|levels of detail]].
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* '''[[Mesh/Mesh_physics|Physics weight]]''': Calculated by determining the complexity of the object's physics model.  You can reduce the complexity of a mesh's physics model by using the [[Mesh/Uploading a mesh|UPLOAD MODEL WIZARD]], by uploading your own less-detailed physics model, or by choosing a different [[fake link|physics type]] .  Vehicles must have a physics weight of 32 or lower, but may have higher streaming or simulation weights.
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* '''[[Mesh/Mesh_Server_Weight|Simulation weight]]''': Measures the impact an object has on Second Life's server resources.  Objects that are composed of many prims and have physics enabled and/or contain scripts tend to have high simulation weights.
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== How to find an object's prim-equivalent value ==
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When an object is [http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Viewerhelp:Glossary#rez rezzed] inworld, you can find its prim-equivalent value by editing it and viewing the [http://community.secondlife.com/t5/English-Knowledge-Base/Build-Tools/ta-p/700039 Build Tools] window.  Next to the number of objects and prims you have selected, a third number labeled ''PE'' indicates the prim-equivalent value.  This third value does not appear if the prim-equivalent value is not different from the number of prims you have selected.
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[[Image:Prim_equivalence.png]]
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Latest revision as of 12:36, 12 August 2011

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