Difference between revisions of "UTF-8"

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m (i dont think this is due to special utf8 characters. i think one case of one of these functions may simply be wrong!)
m (<lsl> tag to <source>)
 
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These functions are part of the [[Combined Library]] written by {{User|Strife Onizuka}}.
 
These functions are part of the [[Combined Library]] written by {{User|Strife Onizuka}}.
  
== Limits ==
+
== Limits under Mono ==
  
Unicode predominately contains simple characters. For the vast majority of the range of values, unicode values are simply characters. However some unicode values are not, they are instructions. UnicodeIntegerToUTF8 and UTF8ToUnicodeInteger work perfectly for the simple characters; however not so well for the other values. More on these ranges can be found in the [http://unicode.org Unicode] specification.
+
One of the side effects of using the Mono VM is that the string encoding used is not the archaic version of UTF-8 that the LSO VM uses, but instead is a much later version of UTF-16. The important difference is that some ranges of values that could be encoded in the old UTF-8 are not well supported in Mono's UTF-16 implementation. This means some values that worked with these functions in LSO, will not work under Mono.
  
These integer ranges are ranges where UTF8ToUnicodeInteger() and UnicodeIntegerToUTF8() are NOT inverse functions of each other.
+
Unless you are using these functions to pack data in strings you are unlikely to ever need to know or worry about this.
Converting these integers to utf8 and back to integer may likely result in a different integer, no longer guaranteeing uniqueness:
+
  
* [55296..57343]    (2048 = 2^11 values, this might mean that the 11-bit utf8 part of one of the functions is simply WRONG!)
+
Some background: Unicode predominately contains simple characters. However some Unicode values do not represent characters but have special meaning within the Unicode Specification. Under Mono these results in one or more question marks ("?"). UnicodeIntegerToUTF8 and UTF8ToUnicodeInteger work perfectly for the simple characters; however not so well for the other values. More on these ranges can be found in the [http://unicode.org Unicode] specification and [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specials_%28Unicode_block%29 Specials (Unicode block)]. While LSO doesn't care about these limitations, Mono does.
* [65534..65535]
+
* [1114112..???]    (so far all tested 32-bit integers >1114112 failed) (1114112 = 0b100010000000000000000 (in binary))
+
  
But the range [65536..1114111] seems to be fine, but this long range takes a while to test all integers.
+
The following integer ranges are where UTF8ToUnicodeInteger() and UnicodeIntegerToUTF8() are NOT inverse functions of each other under Mono.
 +
Converting these integers to utf8 and back to integer may likely result in the integer 63 (the Unicode codepoint for "?"), no longer guaranteeing uniqueness:
  
Some characters within ranges where the two functions are inverse functions of each other may still behave VERY STRANGE if more than 1 character is stored in a string (of multiple characters). They may ...
+
* [55296..57343] (2048 values). This corresponds to the surrogate area U+D800-U+DFFF, which is a reserved range because it's used by UTF-16 to represent the code points above U+FFFF.
 
+
* [65534] U+FFFE is in fact THE intentionally "INVALID CHARACTER" Unicode code point. It is invalid by design.
* become double characters and mess up your indexing within a string. (this may even vary, depending on if a text field uses utf8 or utf16)
+
* [1114112 and above] can't be encoded because the Unicode range stops at U+10FFFF.
* merge with other characters into "super-mega-dino-mecha-character" (see "unicode combined characters")
+
* are reserved characters (especially for JSON-like string serializations but also for simple things like "\n")
+
* become invisible and may be skipped over by some functions (depending on compiler, VM, environment and programming language)
+
 
+
Because of that you quickly get down to a range of 65504 unique SINGLE characters (still working in LSO in case you unchecked the "mono" button by accident) (<2^16 due to avoiding a lot of reserved and invalid characters) being able to store 2^15 bits per character in a string within lsl (for mono and LSO compiler).  
+
 
+
Storing 15 bits per character in a string quickly becomes more memory efficient than storing a list of 32-bit integers.
+
Each mono-integer taking 16 bytes to store 32 bit.
+
Each mono-character taking only 2 bytes to store 15 bit, + 18 taking bytes per string itself to store a string of characters.
+
  
 
== Standard ==
 
== Standard ==
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This version of UnicodeIntegerToUTF8 complies to the latest standard. [[LSO]] on the other hand complies to an earlier standard. The newer standard includes only a subset of the older standard. The extended range of the old standard went unused so this incompleteness is moot.
 
This version of UnicodeIntegerToUTF8 complies to the latest standard. [[LSO]] on the other hand complies to an earlier standard. The newer standard includes only a subset of the older standard. The extended range of the old standard went unused so this incompleteness is moot.
  
<lsl>string UnicodeIntegerToUTF8(integer input)//Mono Safe, LSLEditor Safe, LSO Incomplete
+
<source lang="lsl2">string UnicodeIntegerToUTF8(integer input)//Mono Safe, LSLEditor Safe, LSO Incomplete
 
{//LSO allows for the older UTF-8 range, this function only supports the new UTF-16 range.
 
{//LSO allows for the older UTF-8 range, this function only supports the new UTF-16 range.
 
     if(input > 0)
 
     if(input > 0)
Line 58: Line 47:
 
     @error;
 
     @error;
 
     return "";
 
     return "";
}</lsl>
+
}</source>
  
 
== General Use ==
 
== General Use ==
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This version will work fine in [[LSO]] and [[Mono]] but not in LSLEditor.
 
This version will work fine in [[LSO]] and [[Mono]] but not in LSLEditor.
  
<lsl>//===================================================//
+
<source lang="lsl2">//===================================================//
 
//                Combined Library                  //
 
//                Combined Library                  //
 
//            "Feb  4 2008", "08:35:00"            //
 
//            "Feb  4 2008", "08:35:00"            //
Line 105: Line 94:
 
string hexc="0123456789ABCDEF";
 
string hexc="0123456789ABCDEF";
  
//} Combined Library</lsl>
+
//} Combined Library</source>
  
 
==LSLEditor Safe==
 
==LSLEditor Safe==
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This version will work in [[Mono]], [[LSO]] & LSLEditor. There will be a slight performance hit in [[LSO]] as compared to the LSLEditor Unsafe version.
 
This version will work in [[Mono]], [[LSO]] & LSLEditor. There will be a slight performance hit in [[LSO]] as compared to the LSLEditor Unsafe version.
  
<lsl>//===================================================//
+
<source lang="lsl2">//===================================================//
 
//                Combined Library                  //
 
//                Combined Library                  //
 
//            "Feb  4 2008", "08:38:13"            //
 
//            "Feb  4 2008", "08:38:13"            //
Line 154: Line 143:
 
string hexc="0123456789ABCDEF";
 
string hexc="0123456789ABCDEF";
  
//} Combined Library</lsl>
+
//} Combined Library</source>

Latest revision as of 14:48, 22 January 2015

Second Life uses UTF-8 for storing and transmitting strings and with these functions you can work with Unicode characters. See: Unicode In 5 Minutes for a brief introduction to Unicode.


These functions are part of the Combined Library written by Strife Onizuka.

Limits under Mono

One of the side effects of using the Mono VM is that the string encoding used is not the archaic version of UTF-8 that the LSO VM uses, but instead is a much later version of UTF-16. The important difference is that some ranges of values that could be encoded in the old UTF-8 are not well supported in Mono's UTF-16 implementation. This means some values that worked with these functions in LSO, will not work under Mono.

Unless you are using these functions to pack data in strings you are unlikely to ever need to know or worry about this.

Some background: Unicode predominately contains simple characters. However some Unicode values do not represent characters but have special meaning within the Unicode Specification. Under Mono these results in one or more question marks ("?"). UnicodeIntegerToUTF8 and UTF8ToUnicodeInteger work perfectly for the simple characters; however not so well for the other values. More on these ranges can be found in the Unicode specification and Specials (Unicode block). While LSO doesn't care about these limitations, Mono does.

The following integer ranges are where UTF8ToUnicodeInteger() and UnicodeIntegerToUTF8() are NOT inverse functions of each other under Mono. Converting these integers to utf8 and back to integer may likely result in the integer 63 (the Unicode codepoint for "?"), no longer guaranteeing uniqueness:

  • [55296..57343] (2048 values). This corresponds to the surrogate area U+D800-U+DFFF, which is a reserved range because it's used by UTF-16 to represent the code points above U+FFFF.
  • [65534] U+FFFE is in fact THE intentionally "INVALID CHARACTER" Unicode code point. It is invalid by design.
  • [1114112 and above] can't be encoded because the Unicode range stops at U+10FFFF.

Standard

This version of UnicodeIntegerToUTF8 complies to the latest standard. LSO on the other hand complies to an earlier standard. The newer standard includes only a subset of the older standard. The extended range of the old standard went unused so this incompleteness is moot.

string UnicodeIntegerToUTF8(integer input)//Mono Safe, LSLEditor Safe, LSO Incomplete
{//LSO allows for the older UTF-8 range, this function only supports the new UTF-16 range.
    if(input > 0)
    {
        if(input <= 0x7FF)
        {//instead of a flat if else chain, this redistributes the fork load so that only the 4 byte characters result in 3 forks, all the other paths are 2 forks.
            if(input <= 0x7F){
                input = input << 24;
                jump quick_return;//saves us from the implicit double jump that using an else would cause.
            }
            input = 0xC0800000 | ((input << 18) & 0x1F000000) | ((input << 16) & 0x3F0000);
        }
        else if(input <= 0xFFFF)
            input = 0xE0808000 | ((input << 12) & 0x0F000000) | ((input << 10) & 0x3F0000) | ((input << 8) & 0x3F00);
        else if(input <= 0x10FFFF)
            input = 0xF0808080 | ((input << 06) & 0x07000000) | ((input << 04) & 0x3F0000) | ((input << 2) & 0x3F00) | (input & 0x3F);
        else
            jump error;//not in our range
        @quick_return;
        return llBase64ToString(llIntegerToBase64(input));
    }
    @error;
    return "";
}

General Use

This version will work fine in LSO and Mono but not in LSLEditor.

//===================================================//
//                 Combined Library                  //
//             "Feb  4 2008", "08:35:00"             //
//  Copyright (C) 2004-2008, Strife Onizuka (cc-by)  //
//    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/    //
//===================================================//
//{
 
integer UTF8ToUnicodeInteger(string input)//LSLEditor Unsafe, LSO Safe
{
    integer result = llBase64ToInteger(llStringToBase64(input = llGetSubString(input,0,0)));
    if(result & 0x80000000)//multibyte, continuing to use base64 is impractical because it requires smart shifting.
        return  (   (  0x0000003f &  result       ) |
                    (( 0x00003f00 &  result) >> 2 ) | 
                    (( 0x003f0000 &  result) >> 4 ) | 
                    (( 0x3f000000 & (result = (integer)("0x"+llGetSubString(input,-8,-1)))) >> 6 ) | 
                    (( 0x0000003f &  result) << 24) | 
                    (( 0x00000100 & (result = (integer)("0x"+llDeleteSubString(input = (string)llParseString2List(llEscapeURL(input),(list)"%",[]),-8,-1)))) << 22)
                ) & (  0x7FFFFFFF >> (5 * ((integer)(llLog(~result) / 0.69314718055994530941723212145818) - 25)));
//                    (( 0x00000100 & (result = (integer)("0x"+llDeleteSubString(input,-8,-1)))) << 22)
//                ) & (  0x7FFFFFFF >> (30 - (5 * (llStringLength(input = (string)llParseString2List(llEscapeURL(input),(list)"%",[])) >> 1))));
    return result >> 24;
}
 
string UnicodeIntegerToUTF8(integer input)//LSLEditor Unsafe, LSO Safe
{
    integer bytes = llCeil((llLog(input) / 0.69314718055994530941723212145818));
    string result = "%" + byte2hex((input >> (6 * bytes)) | ((0x3F80 >> bytes) << !(bytes = ((input >= 0x80) * (bytes + ~(((1 << bytes) - input) > 0)) / 5))));
    while (bytes)
        result += "%" + byte2hex((((input >> (6 * (bytes = ~-bytes))) | 0x80) & 0xBF));
    return llUnescapeURL(result);
}
 
string byte2hex(integer x)//LSLEditor Safe, LSO Safe
{//Helper function for use with unicode characters.
    integer y = (x >> 4) & 0xF;
    return llGetSubString(hexc, y, y) + llGetSubString(hexc, x & 0xF, x & 0xF);
}//This function would benefit greatly from the DUP opcode, it would remove 19 bytes.
 
string hexc="0123456789ABCDEF";
 
//} Combined Library

LSLEditor Safe

This version will work in Mono, LSO & LSLEditor. There will be a slight performance hit in LSO as compared to the LSLEditor Unsafe version.

//===================================================//
//                 Combined Library                  //
//             "Feb  4 2008", "08:38:13"             //
//  Copyright (C) 2004-2008, Strife Onizuka (cc-by)  //
//    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/    //
//===================================================//
//{
 
integer UTF8ToUnicodeInteger(string input)//LSLEditor Safe, LSO Safe
{
    integer result = llBase64ToInteger(llStringToBase64(input = llGetSubString(input,0,0)));
    if(result & 0x80000000){//multibyte, continuing to use base64 is impractical because it requires smart shifting.
        integer end = (integer)("0x"+llGetSubString(input = (string)llParseString2List(llEscapeURL(input),(list)"%",[]),-8,-1));
        integer begin = (integer)("0x"+llDeleteSubString(input,-8,-1));
        return  (   (  0x0000003f &  end       ) |
                    (( 0x00003f00 &  end) >> 2 ) | 
                    (( 0x003f0000 &  end) >> 4 ) | 
                    (( 0x3f000000 &  end) >> 6 ) |
                    (( 0x0000003f &  begin) << 24) |
                    (( 0x00000100 &  begin) << 22)
                ) & (0x7FFFFFFF >> (5 * ((integer)(llLog(~result) / 0.69314718055994530941723212145818) - 25)));
    }
    return result >> 24;
}
 
string UnicodeIntegerToUTF8(integer input)//LSLEditor Safe, LSO Safe
{
    integer bytes = llCeil((llLog(input) / 0.69314718055994530941723212145818));
    bytes = (input >= 0x80) * (bytes + ~(((1 << bytes) - input) > 0)) / 5;//adjust
    string result = "%" + byte2hex((input >> (6 * bytes)) | ((0x3F80 >> bytes) << !bytes));
    while (bytes)
        result += "%" + byte2hex((((input >> (6 * (bytes = ~-bytes))) | 0x80) & 0xBF));
    return llUnescapeURL(result);
}
 
string byte2hex(integer x)//LSLEditor Safe, LSO Safe
{//Helper function for use with unicode characters.
    integer y = (x >> 4) & 0xF;
    return llGetSubString(hexc, y, y) + llGetSubString(hexc, x & 0xF, x & 0xF);
}//This function would benefit greatly from the DUP opcode, it would remove 19 bytes.
 
string hexc="0123456789ABCDEF";
 
//} Combined Library