Hardware Integration

From Second Life Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

About

A number of projects are underway which aim to integrate various hardware with Second Life. This page aims to illustrate some of these projects, to give an impression of possibilities and to spark imagination.

At the University of Ulster (Magee) numerous projects involved with hardware integration have been recently developed in the Serious Games and Virtual World Research Team.

You may visit the demos at Ulster Magee 3 (158, 145, 125).

Projects

Developing a web interface which allows users to remotely interact with a virtual robot arm via a website

The virtual robot created in Second Life is remotely controlled by a website. The data is sent to Second Life and the robot reacts by executing requested movements from a control panel on a website. This “robot arm” and its movements are designed according to real robot hardware. The web interface allows the user to control the virtual robot arm by clicking HTML buttons, and so executing a PHP script that sends appropriate executions to the virtual object through the Second Life XML-RPC server.

Integrating wireless temperature and light sensors

This project aimed to view the status of sensors (placed in a real building on campus) in Second Life. Hardware used included a Millennial wireless kit, with a router and “end nodes”, carrying the different sensors - temperature and light. The goal was to place the sensors in different rooms, establish the connection with the wireless router plugged on a server PC, get the data from the sensors and send it to Second Life Server. The results are then displayed in the virtual building in Second Life.

Programming a fan in real life to respond to an avatar increasing or decreasing the speed on a virtual fan in Second Life

This project is to initiate and control the speed of a physical and virtual fan through the virtual world of Second Life. A user can increase and decrease the speed of a physical fan through their virtual avatar. This functionality is available to any user of Second Life.

Programming a washing machine sensor in real life to respond to an avatar interacting with a replica washing machine demo in Second Life

The Washing Machine Simulator (WMS) incorporates a series of input and output devices which together simulate the actions of a typical domestic washing machine. A seven segment display may be controlled by four digital outputs to highlight the ‘was program status’. Control is possible by inputs through the coloured push buttons and indicated by colour LED’s. Two outputs are used to control the disc motor, one turns it on and the other alters the direction of rotation. Motor speed may be varied through pulse width modulation. Speed is measured using a sensor through the four holes in the disc that represent the washing machine drum. Test points are fitted and fault switch for teaching diagnostics.

Controlling a virtual Wiimote in Second Life with a physical Nintendo Wiimote

The aim of this project was to control a virtual device in Second Life with a physical device. The physical controller used was the Nintendo Wiimote. In order to see the possibilities of this controller, the design and model the Wiimote in Second Life has been designed to have the same behaviours as the physical Nintendo Wiimote.

Controlling a virtual robot arm in Second Life with a Nintendo Wiimote

A Katana robot was replicated in Second Life and Linden Scripting Language was used to apply the same behaviours as the physical Katana robot.

Controlling a virtual catapult in Second Life with a physical Nintendo Wiimote

The aim of this project was to control a catapult in Second Life with a physical device. The physical controller used was the Nintendo Wiimote.