Talk:On rez

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Object Duplicate

It seems that this event does not fire when an object is duplicated in-world using the Shift-Key + Drag-Posistion-Arrow technique. I wonder.. Is there a way (in LSL) to detect this occurance? As I see it there are a few ways for a script to appear in-world:

  1. Copied/moved from inventory.
  2. Creating a new script in an object.
  3. Saving/resetting a script already in an object.
  4. Using the Shift-Drag technique to duplicate an existing rezzed object.
  5. Copying/moving an object, that has a script inside it, from inventory to the world.
  6. Sending a script via llGiveInventory.
  7. Sending a script via llRemoteLoadScriptPin.

As far as I can tell, there is no way to tell, programmatically, between numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4. Number 5 keeps the script's state and fires on_rez; Number 6 sends the script to the other object in a deactivated way; And number 7 can send a start parameter. Yet, to me, it seems that #4 should fire on_rez. Any reasons why not? If doing number 4 reset the script, then called on_rez, it could be easily detected. Cron Stardust 00:42, 26 December 2007 (PST)

Disambiguation

A disambiguation notice should probably be added to the page, to avoid confusion among people looking for the third party OnRez viewer. SignpostMarv Martin 04:34, 26 December 2007 (PST)

Sim restart

Is on_rez triggered when a sim is restarted? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Mardu Kuhn

Nopes, doesn't trigger an on_rez event. But it triggers changed with CHANGED_REGION_START.
--Zai signature.png (talk|contribs) 17:11, 21 February 2010 (UTC)


HOW TO GIVE A FLOAT AS STARTPARAMETER IN ON_REZ FUNCTION

By Blade Gaelyth <lsl> float f = 12345.6789;

//*****ENCODING THE FLOAT INTO AN INTEGER*****

//separate integers and decimals list l = llParseString2List((string)f, ["."], []);

//define dot's position integer n = llStringLength(llList2String(l, 0));

//build the string dot position + integers + decimals string m = (string)n + llList2String(l, 0) + llList2String(l, 1);

//cast into an integer and send as startParam integer startParam = (integer)m; </lsl> <lsl> //*****DECODING THE FLOAT FROM THE INTEGER*****

//extract dot position integer dot = (integer)llGetSubString((string)startParam, 0, 0);

//delete dot position string num = llDeleteSubString((string)startParam, 0, 0);

//separate the integers and the decimals string part1 = llGetSubString(num, 0, dot-1); string part2 = llDeleteSubString(num, 0, dot-1);

//build the string integers + dot + decimals string v = part1 + "." + part2;

//cast into a float float f = (float)v; </lsl> AS YOU SEE BY THIS ROUTINE YOU CAN PRESERVE UNTIL 9 DECIMALS THAT IS MORE THAN ENOUGH FOR LSL USE. HOWEVER YOU CAN PRESERVE AS MANY DECIMALS AS YOU NEED BY SIMPLY ENCODING-DECODING THE HEADER IN TWO OR MORE DIGITS; <lsl> //UNTIL 99 DECIMALS // 07 == 7 DECIMALS // 12 == 12 DECIMALS //UNTIL 999 DECIMALS // 003 == 3 DECIMALS // 123 == 123 DECIMALS </lsl>


*cringe's at all caps*
If you want to pass a float without having to worry about if it's in range, you can use FUI and IUF. -- Strife (talk|contribs) 14:55, 15 October 2013 (PDT)